Sunday Songs: "Jester & June" by Craig Finn

Comment

Sunday Songs: "Jester & June" by Craig Finn

Craig Finn is one of my favorite performers of all time. I love his band The Hold Steady but his solo stuff is probably my most frequently listened to music of the past few years. He's one the greatest storytellers writing songs today. Each of his songs are like Raymond Carver stories set to music. His characters are so complete and real.

"Jester & June" from his latest album "We All Want the Same Things" is one of his best. It's a wonderful story about a couple of ne'er-do-wells who are trying to reclaim their old nicknames.

Huge inspiration.

We put too much faith
Gave too much cash
To that one creepy kid at the car wash
He said he could make a few calls
But I don’t think he made any calls

Well we probably should have tried the guy with the Dracula cape
Because other than the cape he was cool
He had that wild kind of sadness
Like he was something important
I wonder if he even remembers
They used to call us Junebug and Jester
They used to call us Jester and June

Comment

Sunday Songs: "Wellspring" by Jeffrey Martin

Comment

Sunday Songs: "Wellspring" by Jeffrey Martin

Been listening to Jeffrey Martin's "Dogs in the Daylight" a lot lately. He's a new discovery for me and is quickly becoming a favorite. The guy's a wonderful writer.

"Welspring" is a pretty staggering piece of music. A tragic and beautiful story. 

No man can escape the sins his father makes, he is bound in blood to what he does and all that he takes.

Seriously.

Comment

Sunday Songs: "Jacksonville" by American Aquarium

Comment

Sunday Songs: "Jacksonville" by American Aquarium

Been listening to this one a lot. I'm beginning work on a new novel, and this is one of the many songs that's helping to inform the tone. Love the feel of it.

I spent the better part of my early twenties medicated and always running
From the man my mamma wanted me to be
Now the nights are lonely and hard to remember another show another bartender
Another place another face that’ll fade away with time

Comment

Great review of Korsakoff Blight

Comment

Great review of Korsakoff Blight

Val D'Orazio's incredible Butterfly Language posted a fantastic and thoughtful review of Korsakoff Blight. Thrilled for the book to be featured on one of my favorite blogs.

Here's a bit:

...though it is tempting for me to compare it to a work like Fight Club, a far more apt description would be, “Post-Fight Club.” For despite its blunt—sometimes comical, sometimes tragic—depictions of depression, substance abuse, violence, and an absolutely crushing sense of anomie, Korsakoff Blight is ultimately a road map to exactly that much sought-after enlightenment.

Comment

Sunday Songs: "Desperados Under the Eaves" by Warren Zevon

Comment

Sunday Songs: "Desperados Under the Eaves" by Warren Zevon

This is one of those songs that will come on shuffle and I'll replay it over and over again. Not sure what it is, but it just gets to me. In a very good way. Such an undercurrent of sadness. 

And if California slides into the ocean
Like the mystics and statistics say it will
I predict this motel will be standing until I pay my bill

Comment

Read the complete Tyranny of the Muse #5

Comment

Read the complete Tyranny of the Muse #5

The final page of Tyranny of the Muse #5, the comic series I created/write, is up at Study Group Comics. Head over there to read the whole issue now. If you need to catch up, you can read the previous 4 here

I'm really proud of this issue. I'm so happy with the work Dave Chisholm did on the art. I think it's the best one yet.

It'll be hitting print and digital in the next couple of months.

Click the thing to read the whole thing.

Comment

Sunday Songs: "The Sing" by Bill Callahan

Comment

Sunday Songs: "The Sing" by Bill Callahan

"The Sing" by Bill Callahan feels like wandering a city alone. It smells like a damp carpet in a bar. It's a perfect song for sipping an afternoon drink while sitting at a wobbly table, mindlessly staring at a baseball game with the sound turned off. It goes good with a notepad and a pen.

"The only words I've said today are 'beer' and 'thank you'."

Beautiful.

Comment

Regular Show: Wrasslesplosion is in stores now

Comment

Regular Show: Wrasslesplosion is in stores now

I wrote the side-story in the newest Regular Show original graphic novel WRASSLEPSLOSION. It's all about pro wrestling. The main story (by Ryan Ferrier, Laura Howell, and Fred Stresing) involves Mordecai and Rigby doing battle in the land of Pound Town where wrestling is all there is. The story I wrote is called "The Comeback." It's 20 pages and about the guys meeting Mordecai's hero -- the washed-up, overly clingy pro wrestler Don Dynamo. I had a great time writing it. This all-ages stuff is really fun. Elle Power did the art, Lisa Moore colored it, and Warren Montgomery lettered it. They did awesome jobs.

It's now available in comic shops and ComiXology. It'll be on Amazon July 4.

Here's a preview. Go get the whole thing.

Comment

Korsakoff Blight is now available in print

Comment

Korsakoff Blight is now available in print

A few months ago I released my new book Korsakoff Blight on Kindle. Now that sucker is ready to go on in print. It's an updated draft with a sweet cover by Jamaica Dyer. I'm very proud of this book and I think you'll like it. For real.

Here are the details:

What do a troubled writer, a clueless private eye, a dead guy, and a kid who’s perpetually doing battle with a psychotic murderer have in common? Maybe nothing. Maybe everything. In KORSAKOFF BLIGHT, these four characters explore the origins of fiction, storytelling, and creativity in a strange, yet deceptively simple setting that echoes the work of Philip K. Dick, Franz Kafka, Charlie Kaufman, and David Lynch. 
 
Korsakoff Blight is a writer. So was his father, whose name was also Korsakoff Blight. When the elder Blight dies and leaves his house to his estranged son, Korsakoff Jr. embarks on bizarre journey into the center of the creative soul, all while wrestling with the specter of a lost father. 
 
What does it mean to be an artist? What does it mean to be a husband? What does it mean to be a father? What does it mean to be a creator? What does it mean to created? What does it mean to be anything? Part existential mystery, part surrealistic nightmare, part coming-of-age comedy, KORSAKOFF BLIGHT by author Eddie Wright (Broken Bulbs, Tyranny of the Muse, Regular Show) is a complex, fast-paced, and unique take on the philosophical questions that plague us all.

Go to Amazon to get it right now. It'll be available through other outlets soon.

Also, please please please leave a review on Amazon. I'd really appreciate that.

Comment

Denis Johnson

Comment

Denis Johnson

Write naked. That means to write what you would never say.
Write in blood. As if ink is so precious you can’t waste it.
Write in exile, as if you are never going to get home again, and you have to call back every detail.

Denis Johnson died. Jesus' Son is one of my favorite books ever. One of the reasons I started writing. Alison Maclean's adaptation is one of my favorite movies as well. Huge influence on my stuff.

I like this quote from a New Yorker piece on him.

Sad news.

Comment

Hands on the Wheel

Comment

Hands on the Wheel

Been thinking about Harry Dean Stanton a lot lately.

"There's a couple of mistakes there but leave 'em in there. Who gives a fuck."

Comment

Read Tyranny of the Muse #5

Comment

Read Tyranny of the Muse #5

Tyranny of the Muse #5 is now serializing on Study Group Comics. In this issue, we learn how Frank and Bonnie got together. It's a good one. Lots of teeth get brushed.

Click this awesome cover to read the first 5 pages and check back every Friday for a new one.

I'm very proud of this issue. Dave Chisholm is delivering his best art yet. I hope you dig it. 

If you need to catch up on the series, you can read the first four issues here

Comment

"All scenes lead to each other."

Comment

"All scenes lead to each other."

I'm reading Steve Erickson's Zeroville for the first time. Not sure what took so long to jump in. But I dig it.

Particularly this bit:

Each scene is in all times, Vikar tells himself, and all times are in each scene. Each shot, each set-up, each sequence is in all times, all times are in each shot, each set-up, each sequence. The scenes of a movie can be shot out of sequence not because it’s more convenient, but because all the scenes of a movie are really happening at the same time. No scene really leads to the next, all scenes lead to each other. No scene is really shot “out of order.” It’s a false concern that a scene must anticipate another that follows, even if it’s not been shot yet, or that a scene must reflect a scene that precedes it, even if it’s not been shot yet, because all scenes anticipate and reflect each other. Scenes reflect what has not yet happened, scenes anticipate what already has happened. Scenes that have not yet happened, have. “Continuity” is one of the myths of film; in film, time is round, like a reel. Fuck, as Dotty would say, continuity.

Reminds me of some of themes I tried to explore in Korsakoff Blight

Comment

Korsakoff Blight is out now

Comment

Korsakoff Blight is out now

KORSAKOFF BLIGHT, my new novel is now available for Amazon Kindle. It's just $2.99. If you've dug anything that I've written, you'll definitely dig this one. It's weird, funny, sad, dark, weird, and weird. I'm proud of it.

Click the cover to get it. And if you do, please review it. That'll really help.

Synopsis:

What do a troubled writer, a clueless private eye, a dead guy, and a kid who’s perpetually doing battle with a psychotic murderer have in common? Maybe nothing. Maybe everything. In KORSAKOFF BLIGHT, these four characters explore the origins of fiction, storytelling, and creativity in a strange, yet deceptively simple setting that echoes the work of Philip K. Dick, Franz Kafka, Charlie Kaufman, and David Lynch. 

Korsakoff Blight is a writer. So was his father, whose name was also Korsakoff Blight. When the elder Blight dies and leaves his house to his estranged son, Korsakoff Jr. embarks on bizarre journey into the center of the creative soul, all while wrestling with the specter of a lost father.

What does it mean to be an artist? What does it mean to be a husband? What does it mean to be a father? What does it mean to be a creator? What does it mean to created? What does it mean to be anything? Part existential mystery, part surrealistic nightmare, part coming-of-age comedy, KORSAKOFF BLIGHT by author Eddie Wright (Broken Bulbs, Tyranny of the Muse, Regular Show) is a complicated, fast-paced, and unique take on the philosophical quandaries that plague us all.

Comment

Pre-order KORSAKOFF BLIGHT, my new book

Comment

Pre-order KORSAKOFF BLIGHT, my new book

Hey. Hello. How are you? Okay? Okay. 

So I've announced this before, but then delayed it. And then I announced it again. But then delayed it again. But now, all that delaying business is no more. Because here it is, for real.

KORSAKOFF BLIGHT, my new novella is available to pre-order for Amazon Kindle. It's true. It's finished and coming out on Feb 28, 2017.

Here's the very sharp cover by the fantastic Jamaica Dyer.

And here's the thing about it:

What do a troubled writer, a clueless private eye, a dead guy, and a kid who’s perpetually doing battle with a psychotic murderer have in common? Maybe nothing. Maybe everything. In KORSAKOFF BLIGHT, these four characters explore the origins of fiction, storytelling, and creativity in a strange, yet deceptively simple setting that echoes the work of Philip K. Dick, Franz Kafka, Charlie Kaufman, and David Lynch.

Korsakoff Blight is a writer. So was his father, whose name was also Korsakoff Blight. When the elder Blight dies and leaves his house to his estranged son, Korsakoff Jr. embarks on bizarre journey into the center of the creative soul, all while wrestling with the specter of a lost father.

What does it mean to be an artist? What does it mean to be a husband? What does it mean to be a father? What does it mean to be a creator? What does it mean to created? What does it mean to be anything? Part existential mystery, part surrealistic nightmare, part coming-of-age comedy, KORSAKOFF BLIGHT by author Eddie Wright (Broken Bulbs, Tyranny of the Muse, Regular Show) is a complicated, fast-paced, and unique take on the philosophical quandaries that plague us all.

I'm proud of the book. If you're into Broken Bulbs or Tyranny of the Muse, I think you'll enjoy it. So you should head over to Amazon and pre-order Korsakoff Blight for your Kindle device/apps. It'll be out for real on Feb 28. And it'd be really nice if you shared it and told folks about it and things like that too. I'd appreciate it.

Comment